John Cali

I’ve been away from home going on two weeks now, and it’s been an unexpectedly busy time. Not everything went as planned. So I’ve written this week’s article without Spirit. They’ll return next week.

Have you ever told yourself things always work out for you, knowing in your gut it’s true? Even when you could not see “the light at the end of the tunnel?” Or do you usually expect the worst?

It’s been only in recent years that I’ve consistently believed things always work out. But I was put to a tough test a few weeks ago.

My son was in Cairo, Egypt on business when the recent riots broke out. Naturally, all my family and I were deeply concerned about his safety.

This was a grand opportunity for me to “walk my talk.” When someone I love was in imminent physical danger, how was I going to react?

I surprised myself.

There were several days of uncertainty when we weren’t sure if my son and his travelling companions would get out of Egypt quickly and safely. But during those few uncertain days I felt a deep sense of peace. That was not my reaction in other past similar circumstances.

One of my favorite authors is Mark Twain. I clearly recall, when I was in my early 20s, reading one of his short stories. I don’t remember the title, but the story’s stayed with me all these years.

It begins with a young man leaving his family and going off to war. He had everything to live for and the future looked bright. But he never returned home again.

Then the author talked about what the young man’s life would have been like if he’d survived the war.

It was not a pretty picture. All sorts of tragedies and disasters befell him, and he eventually lost all he had, ending up a sad, lonely old man.

The point of the story, at least as I understood it, was dying young was far better than living unhappily to a ripe old age. Death was not the tragedy here. Life was. Things worked out well for that young man. As they always do for all of us.

As Spirit often says, “All is well.”