John Cali

As most of you will recall, I’ve been in New York now for several weeks. This is the first time I’ve left Wyoming in almost a year, and my first visit to a big city in almost a year. I guess I’d forgotten what city life is like.

People here — not all, but certainly most — are living fear-filled lives. In Wyoming we have all the same problems of places with far more people. But the energy, the feeling of Wyoming and the rural Far West is much different, more positive and upbeat. I suppose one reason is there are so few people. We don’t crowd each other into craziness.

Anyway, after spending a couple of weeks in New York, and talking to family and friends I’ve known most of my life, I’ve started compiling a mental list of all the things people are afraid of.

Virtually everyone has an alarm system in their houses. In Wyoming, we often leave our cars and houses unlocked. Of course, that would probably be unwise here.

This year, there’s rampant fear of a flu vaccine shortage here in New York — and I guess other places too.

Traffic on the highways is frantic — almost every driver seems hell-bent on beating out every other driver. That’s something I rarely experience in the West.

In grocery stores, most folks rush around, plucking items off the shelves with barely a pause to look at what they’re buying.

People don’t speak to each other unless they have to. The other day I was out jogging in my sister’s neighborhood, and met seven or eight folks along the way. I tried to say hello to all of them, but only one of them would even look at me.

In my circle of family and friends, there are several financially prosperous people, some who are even millionaires. Yet they are often terrified of running out of money.

The deep sense of fear in this area is a tangible thing — you can feel it, you can see it in people’s eyes. They’re terrified of life. And the condition of the world today doesn’t do much to alleviate people’s fear of life.

And then, of course, there’s death. It was death that brought me here to New York to begin with. Specifically, the death of my sister’s husband.

People are terrified of death. Or, more likely, they’re terrified of dying a lingering painful death from some obscure or not-so-obscure ailment. Even their spiritual beliefs and values seem to offer them little comfort.

So that leaves many people afraid of living, and scared of dying. What a way to live! Where’s the joy in that? That certainly was not the way our higher selves intended us to spend our earthly years in this lifetime.

Here’s Spirit.

Spirit

Friends, if you could only see yourselves as we see you, as your higher selves see you, you would be truly amazed.

You are far more than you have ever imagined. You are far more powerful than you have ever dreamt. You are so powerful you can — and often do — create lives of misery and gloom. It takes a lot more of your energy to create a sad life than it does a happy life.

Your natural state is that of well-being. Happiness is natural. Joy is natural. Good health is natural. Abundance is natural. All the good things you’ve ever wanted in your lives — these are natural. They are your birthright as human beings “descended from,” if you will, your higher selves, and from god, goddess, spirit.

And so if you simply get out of your own way, all good things will flow to you easily and effortlessly. Living (and dying) would be a true joy to you.

But most of you have forgotten all that. You have, instead, bought into the mass consciousness, the consciousness of fear.

You know what we’re talking about — life is dangerous, dying is disaster. And nowhere between life and death do you find any joy.

Or, as a family member of John’s put it some years ago, “Life’s a bitch and then you die.”

That was never the way your higher selves and that divine energy you perceive as god, goddess, intended you to live.

You came to this lifetime to experience the vast diversity of life on Planet Earth. Whatever birth circumstances you (that is, your higher self) chose, the intent was to be a joyful creator, picking and choosing among all the glorious choices and opportunities available to you.

Life is supposed to be good. It’s supposed to be fun. Fear — either of living or dying — is not supposed to be part of this.

Yet fear is a part of your lives, at least for many of you. And that’s because you’ve surrendered to the mass consciousness. And you’ve abandoned the wisdom you carried with you when you incarnated.

We shall talk more of this another time. But for now, friends, trust that all is well.